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Updated onApr. 25, 2022

Best Wheelchair Tires

A wheelchair is just like any other mobility device. It requires regular maintenance to ensure that it works well when you need it. Things like wheels won’t last forever and will need replacing at some point.. Our Best Wheelchair Tires review shows you which ones stand out. Keep reading to learn more about your options.

How We Found the Best Wheelchair Wheels

8 Reviewers
50 Products Considered
12 Hours of Research
7 Products Reviewed
3 Top Picks
Best Indoor

Best Indoor

SCHWALBE Marathon Plus HS 440 Smart Guard Blac
$54.99

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Features and Specifications

  • SmartGuard Performance
  • 520g
  • 85-145
Pros
  • Smoother ride

  • Better traction

  • Less likely to get a flat

Cons
  • Requires more maintenance

  • Cost

The Schwalbe Marathon Plus HS 440 SmartGuard Wheelchair Tire uses a tubeless valve stem. It offers the advantage of fewer flat tires along with better traction since you can lower the pressure in the tires to help with the grip on the floor. Using sealant regularly on the tires can help ensure an airtight seal. It’s especially important if you live in areas with warmer climates.

Our Verdict

While more expensive, they perform better.

Best Solid Rubber

Best Solid Rubber

AL043 24″ x 1 3/8″ SOLID, NO FLAT TIRE. PRICE IS FOR 1 TIRE
$28.75

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Features and Specifications

  • TIRE DOES NOT GO FLAT
Pros
  • Won’t go flat

  • Maintenance-free

  • Cost

Cons
  • Difficult rim installation

  • May require professional installation

The CEW AL043 24″ x 1 3/8″ Solid, No Flat Tire is a good alternative to a pneumatic one. It has a solid rubber interior that will not go flat because there’s no compressed air within it. There is some give and take with traction and surface area contact. Also, the rim on your wheelchair must have an air stem valve hole for it to fit correctly.

Our Verdict

They are a decent value for the peace of mind of no flats.

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Features and Specifications

Pros
  • Includes replacement parts

  • Easy to install

  • Low noise on most surfaces

Cons
  • May be too large for some chairs

  • Sold individually instead of in sets

The TKWC, Inc. Black Replacement Wheel is a solid rubber tire with a plastic hub. The tires won’t go flat and have low road noise. It comes with two bearings that will help when you they need to be replaced.

Our Verdict

They are solid rubber for a longer lifespan.

Features & Specs

  • Pneumatic tire requires 40 PSI
  • 12 ½ by 2 ¼ size
Pros
  • 30-day warranty

  • Fits most manual wheelchairs

  • Adjustable traction

Cons
  • Some routine maintenance required

  • Not sold in set

The TAG 12-½ x 2-¼ Pneumatic Tire is a standard option, pneumatic tire with compressed air and a reinforced rubber casing. The tire is affordable and still delivers a decent traction. The tire fits most manual wheelchair, but they are sold individually rather than sets.

Our Verdict

They are a high-quality product at an affordable price.

Features & Specs

  • Tire fills to maximum 65 PSI
  • Weighs 1 pound
  • Can be bought with pneumatic or poly-foam, air-free tube
Pros
  • CostTread has excellent gripping power

  • 30-day warranty

Cons
  • Sold individually instead of sets

The TAG Pneumatic 22×1-3/8, MM 37-501 will fit most standard wheelchairs. You can purchase it as a regular tire with compressed air or upgrade it to an air-free option.

Our Verdict

They are affordable with an option to upgrade to air-free.

Features & Specs

  • Pneumatic tires
  • Gray color choice
  • Weighs 1 pound
  • 24-inch width and length
Pros
  • Excellent traction over a variety of surfacess

  • read holds up to a lot of wears

  • Won’t scuff floors

Cons
  • Cost

  • Not sold in sets

The New Solutions Tire 24 x 1 – 3/8 Street Tread is an excellent product if you need a tire that can handle a range of surfaces from gravel to pavement to grass. They last while offering a stable, smooth ride. They are a bit more expensive yet make up for it in quality. These tires are high performance with a long lifespan which can help offset the higher price tag.

Our Verdict

They can handle a variety of surfaces while not marring floors.

Features & Specs

  • 2 inch width
  • 2.5 inch-hub with a 5/16-inch bearing
  • Weigh 2 pounds
Pros
  • 30-day warranty

  • Superior traction

  • Cost

  • Won’t leave marks on floor

Cons
  • Not sold in sets

The TAG Tire 8 x 2 Pneumatic Tire is a wide tire with a lot of gripping power for excellent traction and maneuverability. They are gray with a ribbed thread that won’t scuff up the floor or other surfaces. They are an excellent value and are long-lasting.

Our Verdict

They provide excellent traction.

Things to Consider When Buying Tires

Before you buy new tires for your wheelchair, there are several things you should consider. How much do you use your chair? Do you prefer tubeless or tubed tires? What do you expect from the tire’s traction? The tires may be affordable, but they are certainly a long-term investment that you hope will last for quite a while.

Your Usage

It’s essential to begin your search by considering how you use your wheelchair on an everyday basis. If you spend a lot of time outdoors, you’ll encounter a variety of surfaces and conditions that can influence your choice. The build of the tire for these situations differs from one that you’ll need for indoor use.

Think about how often you have to replace tires and the reasons the purchase becomes necessary. If you get flats frequently, you should think about the cause whether it’s the type of product or the conditions of the places you travel.

Compatibility

You’ll find wheelchair tires in a variety of sizes, making measuring vital to ensure the proper fit. There are standard sizes but bear in mind the subtle differences between imperial and metric measurements. We strongly urge you to consult your owner’s manual to get the precise specifications. Also, verify the dimensions of the products to save you the hassle of a return.

Traction

Traction and the tire’s thread are crucial considerations no matter where you go in your wheelchair. The design of these mobility devices cuts down on the risk of tipping over but that doesn’t mean it won’t happen.. That’s where your tires can provide some extra insurance and peace of mind that you won’t get hurt.

If you use public transportation, that presents another valid concern. About 80 percent of people using wheelchairs find it hard to use. A tire with decent traction can make driving onto ramps easier and less troublesome.

Ease Of Use

The practicality of the tire is another consideration that deserves some thought. It can cover a wide range of issues from the installation to the removal to the routine maintenance that a particular tire requires to get the maximum value out of your purchase. It matters little if it’s you or someone else taking care of these things. Remember the point is to make getting around hassle-free.

Tubeless Or Tubed

Tires With Tubes

Tubed or pneumatic tires are the standard choice. You’ll see them frequently with other kinds of transportation including bicycles. They require an inner tube of some type.

On the positive side, you can adjust the pressure to some degree so that more surface area of the tire meets the ground to provide better traction. Likewise, you can add more air for a faster glide across smooth floors. They are also less expensive, making them a practical choice if you’re on a budget.

On the downside, you’re more likely to get a flat with them. If you hit something hard, it can pinch the tube and cause it to tear.

Tubeless Tires

The alternative is to go the tubeless route. The construction is entirely different. However, they offer several advantages beginning with fewer flat tires. You can keep them at a lower pressure which will give your traction a welcome boost. It’ll make it easier to handle corners too. And those little bumps along your path will feel like nothing with the added cushioning.

The disadvantages exist with installation and maintenance, both of which are more time-consuming and difficult. To keep it functioning correctly, the seal between the rim and the tire must remain intact. That means using sealant to keep it airtight. It’s also worth mentioning that these tires are usually more expensive.

There is one other option. That is, going with solid rubber tires instead. The clear-cut advantage is that you won’t get a flat tire because there’s no air to leak out of a puncture. They are typically cheaper too.

Of course, they are not without their cons. The biggest issue with them is marring floors and leaving skid marks that are next to impossible to remove. Most manufacturers use materials to prevent them with options to choose gray instead of black tires. The concern rests with the installation.

The problem lies with the fact that they often have a smaller diameter to give them the necessary bounce if you run into something or go over a rough surface. That makes these tires much more difficult to install and may require taking your wheelchair to a bicycle repair shop or auto mechanic to get the job done.

We suggest keeping all these factors in mind along with the other considerations we’ve discussed to help you choose the right one to balance your needs with the product’s usefulness and practicality.

Summary

Buying replacement parts for your wheelchair is par for the course no matter what type you use. The best wheelchair tires are durable with enough grip to help you move freely and safely whether you’re indoors or outdoors. Our round-up presents several options for different scenarios to help you narrow down your choices to the right one for you.