Best Hearing Aids Of 2022

Hearing loss can impact every area of your life, from talking with friends and family to being able to hear in challenging listening situations. The good news is that wearing a hearing aid can help improve your hearing potential and your overall quality of life.

But with so many companies, styles, and hearing aid models available, it can feel overwhelming to even know where to start. We’ve done the research for you and found that some hearing devices come out on top when it comes to quality, support, price, technology, and fit, making it easy to narrow your choices. Here are 10 of the best hearing aids on the market today.

A Quick Look at the Best Hearing Aids

Written by
Medically Reviewed by
Updated onMay. 24, 2022

Why You Can Trust Our Expert Review

4,000+ Hours of research
11 Experts consulted
17 Brands considered
18 Models considered
10 Models selected

Our experts research and recommend products that can help give you a better quality of life. Using our high standards and rigorous testing methodology, we’ve spent more than 4,000 hours, collectively, researching the best hearing aids to help you find the device that’s best for you. Throughout our research process, we did the following:

  • Consulted with audiologists and geriatric care experts
  • Mystery shopped the hearing aid brands
  • Surveyed hundreds of hearing aid users
  • Tested various models of hearing aids
  • Interviewed experts in the field
  • Read thousands of verified customer reviews

See our full Hearing Aids Ratings Methodology.

Hearing Aids Reviews

  • Cost: $1,195 to $1,995 per pair
  • Type of hearing aid: Receiver-in-the-canal (RIC)
  • Type of hearing loss: Mild to moderately severe
  • Bluetooth capabilities: Yes
  • Battery: 312 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
  • Telecoil: No
  • Warranty/trial period: Three-year manufacturer’s warranty, three-year loss and damage protection, and 100-day money-back trial
  • Financing: Yes

Customer service and continued care are priorities when deciding on a hearing aid company. While most people equate this type of service with brick-and-mortar hearing care centers, online retailers like Lively are changing how we shop for hearing aids.

Lively offers high-tech hearing aids and excellent follow-up care at an incredible value. It also has one of the best risk-free trial periods in the business (100 days!). If you’re comfortable navigating this on your own, Lively is worth checking out.

The process is quite simple, and you have access to customer care at all times. All it takes to start is an online hearing test followed by a pre-purchase video. You then order and pay for your hearing aids. After that, Lively delivers to your doorstep, and the hearing aids are programmed based on your test results.

With the hearing aids, you’ll also get access to the Lively app, which allows you to customize settings and control your device from a smartphone. Plus, the Lively care team of audiologists and tech support is available seven days a week and can provide support through the app.

All Lively hearing aid models are available through the company’s website.

See our full Lively Hearing Aid Review.

  • Cost: $800 to $1,600 (often on sale for $300 to $1,000) per pair
  • Type of hearing aid: Behind-the-ear (BTE)
  • Type of hearing loss: Mild to moderate
  • Bluetooth capabilities: Yes, some models
  • Battery: 312 and 13 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
  • Telecoil: Yes, some models
  • Warranty/trial period: Limited, 90-day basic warranty and 45-day money-back trial
  • Financing: Yes

Budget-friendly devices are always worth considering, especially if you’re limited in what you can spend. With MDHearing Aid, you’ll get one of the best hearing aids for the money from a company that has been in the hearing care business for over a decade. Not only does MDHearingAid keep things affordable, but it also keeps the selection process simple by only offering three models: the Air, VOLT+, and Core.

If you’re looking for an entry-level device, the Air is a good place to start. This hearing aid works for a mild to moderate level of hearing loss in a noisy environment and can help you hear television, conversations, and phone calls.

But if rechargeable battery life and superior sound quality is key, then the company’s most popular model, the VOLT+, might be a better fit. MDHearing Aids also gets positive feedback as one of the best hearing aids for glasses wearers since they fit snugly between your glasses and ear.

All MDHearing Aid models are available through the company’s website, with support provided by a U.S. team of hearing aid specialists.

See our full MDHearingAid Review.

  • Cost: $1,450 to $2,950 per pair
  • Type of hearing aid: Completely-in-the-canal (CIC)
  • Type of hearing loss: Mild to moderate
  • Bluetooth capabilities: Yes
  • Battery: Rechargeable
  • Telecoil: No
  • Warranty/trial period: One to two-year warranty and 45-day money-back guarantee
  • Financing: Yes

Mild to moderate hearing loss is the most common form of hearing loss in the United States, according to a 2016 study from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The good news is that people with this type of hearing loss often respond well to hearing aids like the ones from Eargo, which are designed to address mild to moderate hearing loss.

Eargo is a completely-in-the-canal (CIC) rechargeable hearing aid, making it an extremely discrete and comfortable alternative to bulkier models with superior sound quality. The company also offers several other models, including the Eargo Max, Eargo Neo, Eargo Neo HiFi, and the company’s latest solution: the Eargo 5, which is its smallest hearing aid device to date. Plus, Eargo eliminates the need to sit in waiting rooms and visit clinics through the power of telehealth, shipping the product directly to your door.

You will need to program the device yourself, so this is something to keep in mind if you’re unsure about setting up and programming the device on your own. However, Eargo provides remote support every step of the way with its user-friendly app or on the phone with a hearing specialist.

See our full Eargo Hearing Aid Review.

  • Cost: $1,998 to $4,598, per pair average price; actual price depends on retailer and model
  • Type of hearing aid: Receiver-in-the-canal (RIC)
  • Type of hearing loss: Mild to severe
  • Bluetooth capabilities: Yes
  • Battery: 312 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
  • Telecoil: Yes, some models
  • Warranty/trial period: One-year warranty and 60-day money-back guarantee
  • Financing: Varies by retailer

If you have severe hearing loss, you need a high-powered hearing aid that provides clear sound in any environment. The Phonak Audéo Marvel, one of Phonak’s top performers, is a receiver-in-canal (RIC) hearing aid equipped with all the technology you need to increase the volume of incoming sound while reducing feedback between the microphone and speaker.

Because the Audéo Marvel is an RIC model, the device is sturdy, comfortable, easy to handle, and clean, making this a great choice if you struggle with dexterity.

One thing that sets Phonak apart from its competitor is Roger™ technology. This unique Phonak feature works by picking up voices through a Roger™ microphone, then wirelessly transmitting them to you while reducing background noise. This technology is available in wireless devices like remote microphones, table microphones, and TV streamers designed to help improve speech understanding in difficult-to-hear situations.

Online reviews give this powerful hearing aid tons of positive feedback about its intuitive nature and ease of use. It also receives high praise for its universal Bluetooth connectivity to Android, iPhone, and lots of other smart devices.

You can purchase the Phonak Audéo Marvel directly through a hearing center or audiologist of your choice. Or, you can buy one online through a discount supplier such as Zip Hearing that helps connect you to a participating local dispenser or audiologist who conducts a hearing evaluation, facilitates the order, and assists with your new devices.

See our full Phonak Hearing Aids Review.

  • Cost: Starting at $139 / month
  • Three form-factors: Receiver-in-the-canal, completely-in-canal (CiC), behind-the-ear (BTE)
  • Three technology levels: 3x, 5x and 7x
  • Type of hearing loss: Mild to severe
  • Dedicated Smartphone App: Yes
  • Bluetooth capabilities: Yes
  • Battery: Rechargeable
  • Telecoil: No
  • Warranty/trial period: One- to three-year warranty, 45-day no risk trial
  • Financing: Yes

hear.com Horizon devices make it possible to regain your hearing. To achieve this, we combine the most innovative technology with customer  experience data hear.com has gained from over three million customer consultations. 

As a global leader in hearing aid technology and powered by the world’s most advanced online platform for hearing acoustics, our aim is to offer customers a truly ground breaking auditory experience. Armed with a fleet of unique, customizable devices, Horizon hearing aids not only meet, but exceed every requirement and expectation of hearing aid wearers. 

Each device comes equipped with: 

  • State-of-the-art chip technology (over one billion computing operations / second)
  • Crystal-clear speech comprehension 
  • Natural sound in every situation 
  • Award-winning, discrete design 
  • New smart functions for supreme comfort (Relax Mode and Panorama Effect)
  • Dedicated Horizon smartphone App connection for easy control
  • Cost: $1,950-$3,600 per pair
  • Type of hearing aid: Receiver-in-the-canal (RIC), in-the-ear (ITE), and behind-the-ear (BTE)
  • Type of hearing loss: Mild to severe
  • Bluetooth capabilities: Yes
  • Battery: 312, 13, or 10 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
  • Telecoil: Yes, some models with accessory
  • Warranty/trial period: One-year warranty and 45-day money-back guarantee
  • Financing: Varies by retailer

When it comes to pure, natural sound and clarity, Widex Moment is our pick for the best hearing aid for sound quality. This versatile device is a good choice for musicians, singers, and anyone wanting crisper, more natural sound while performing daily tasks.

What sets the Moment apart from its competitors is its PureSound technology, TruAccoustics, and SoundSense. All three features combine to give you fast processing times, noise reduction, better speech recognition, and an overall improved sound experience in any environment. Plus, the Moment is available in three styles—RIC, BTE, and ITE—so you have several options for finding the right fit.

You can purchase the Widex Moment hearing aid directly through a hearing center or audiologist of your choice. Or, purchase online through a discount supplier like Zip Hearing that helps connect you to a participating local dispenser or audiologist who conducts a hearing evaluation, facilitates the order, and assists with your new devices.

See our full Widex Hearing Aid Review.

  • Cost: $998 to $2,798 per pair
  • Type of hearing aid: Receiver-in-the-canal (RIC), completely-in-the-canal (CIC), and behind-the-ear (BTE)
  • Type of hearing loss: Mild to severe
  • Bluetooth capabilities: Yes
  • Battery: 312 or 10 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
  • Telecoil: Yes, some models
  • Warranty/trial period: One year warranty and 45-day money-back guarantee
  • Financing: No financing options through company; discount available through membership program

If you like the idea of ongoing support and replacement devices, then Audicus is worth considering. Audicus offers two purchase options: a one-time sale or a membership program.

The membership program is a monthly fee-based service that provides support, loss protection, accessories like earwax guards and batteries, and a new pair of hearing aids every 18 months.

To get a better idea of how the membership program works, let’s look at the Wave, which is a middle-range-priced device. If you purchase the Wave outright, it will cost $899 per ear or $1,798 per pair, but they’ll be yours to own forever with unlimited service. If you want insurance, cleaning, or regular delivery of supplies, you will pay extra.

But if you go with the monthly membership plan, you pay $59 or $118 for a pair per month as part of a lease. This gives you access to a device for the duration of your membership and unlimited service. Plus, you’ll benefit from free cleaning, loss and damage protection, regular delivery of supplies, and a new device every 18 months. 

The membership plan might be a good option if you want to try a hearing aid at little cost and low risk, or if you’re still trying to figure out if they’re right for you.

Audicus hearing aids come in a variety of models and price points. The company has five options: the Dia II, Aura, Clara, Wave, and Spirit. All Audicus hearing aid models are available through the company’s website.

See our full Audicus Hearing Aid Review.

  • Cost: $2,898 to $4,598 per pair
  • Type of hearing aid: Receiver-in-the-canal (RIC), receiver-in-the-ear (ITE/RIE), completely-in-the-canal (CIC), in-the-canal (ITC), and behind-the-ear (BTE)
  • Type of hearing loss: Mild to profound (depends on the model)
  • Bluetooth capabilities: Yes
  • Battery: 312 or 10 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
  • Telecoil: Yes, some models
  • Warranty/trial period: One-year warranty and 45-day money-back guarantee
  • Financing: Varies by retailer

When it comes to variety, innovative design, and forward-thinking hearing aid technology, Signia is the clear winner. With hearing aid models covering the gamut of styles, there’s a good chance you’ll find a hearing device that fits your hearing needs.

Plus, Signia is one of the few hearing aid manufacturers that features a CROS (contralateral routing of signal) device made specifically for single-sided hearing loss. The company is also on the cutting-edge of mask technology with their mask mode option on the smartphone app. This feature allows you to better hear people wearing face masks.

But with all the perks comes a higher cost. Like other audiologist-recommended devices, Signia’s devices are not cheap. But if you’re committed to wearing a device and you want innovative technology, Signia is a great brand to consider.

You can purchase Signia hearing aids directly through a hearing center or audiologist of your choice. Or, purchase online through a discount supplier like Zip Hearing that helps connect you to a participating local dispenser or audiologist who conducts a hearing evaluation, facilitates the order, and assists with your new devices.

See our full Signia Hearing Aid Review.

  • Cost: $3,198 to $4,798 per pair
  • Type of hearing aid: Receiver-in-the-ear (RITE)
  • Type of hearing loss: Mild to severe
  • Bluetooth capabilities: Yes
  • Battery: 312 and 13 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
  • Telecoil: Yes
  • Warranty/trial period: One-year warranty and 30-day money-back guarantee
  • Financing: Varies by retailer

Tinnitus impacts millions of people each year, according to the American Tinnitus Association. This perception of sound, when no actual noise is present, can take the form of buzzing, ringing, whistling, and hissing. If you’re dealing with this condition, finding relief is critical to overall quality of life. The good news is that several hearing aid companies like ReSound offer devices with support for hearing loss and tinnitus.

The ReSound One has an excellent reputation for improving tinnitus symptoms while also making it easier to hear in many environments. In fact, it’s routinely rated as one of the best hearing aids for tinnitus on the market. The company prides itself on providing a truly individualized and more complete sound experience by using an extra microphone placed in your ear canal (this is in addition to the two on the hearing aid). The Resound One features a unique Microphone and Receiver-in-Ear (RIE) style.

With the ReSound Assist, you get live assistance and remote fine-tuning, all with your phone. Plus, the ReSound Relief app provides tinnitus management through a combination of sound therapy, relaxing exercises, meditation, and guidance.

You can purchase Resound One directly through a hearing center or audiologist of your choice. Or, purchase online through a discount supplier like Zip Hearing that helps connect you to a participating local dispenser or audiologist who conducts a hearing evaluation, facilitates the order, and assists with your new hearing aids.

See our full ReSound Hearing Aids Review.

  • Cost: $2,700 to $4,800 per pair average price; actual price depends on retailer and model
  • Type of hearing aid: Receiver-in-the-ear (RITE)
  • Type of hearing loss: Mild to severe
  • Bluetooth capabilities: Yes
  • Battery: 312 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
  • Telecoil: Yes
  • Warranty/trial period: Three-year manufacturer’s repair warranty, plus three-year loss and damage warranty and a 45-day money-back trial
  • Financing: Varies by retailer

Seniors looking for a hearing aid that offers cutting-edge technology and superior sound will appreciate what the Oticon More has to offer. Available in three models, the More is appropriate for people with mild to severe hearing loss. The tech features of the Oticon More are numerous and the BrainHearing technology that comes equipped with this device is fantastic and definitely worth checking out—especially the Deep Neural Network, which is trained on 12 million real-life sounds.

But it’s not just technology that sets this hearing aid apart from other models. Users also appreciate the fit and comfort, as well as the tinnitus sound support feature, making it an excellent choice for people looking to get relief from a variety of sounds.

You can purchase the Oticon More directly through a hearing center or audiologist of your choice. You can also purchase it online through a discount supplier such as Zip Hearing that helps connect you to a participating local dispenser or audiologist who conducts a hearing evaluation, facilitates the order, and assists with your new devices.

See our full Oticon Hearing Aid Review.

Best Hearing Aids Comparisons

Brand
Lively
Cost$1,195-$1,995
Type of Hearing AidRIC
Type of Hearing Loss Mild to moderate
BluetoothYes
Battery312 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
TelecoilNo
WarrantyThree-year manufacturer warranty, three-year loss and damage protection, and 100-day money-back trial
FinancingYes
Eargo
Cost$1,450-$2,950
Type of Hearing AidCIC
Type of Hearing Loss Mild to moderate
BluetoothYes
BatteryRechargeable
TelecoilNo
WarrantyOne to two-year warranty and 45-day money-back guarantee
FinancingYes
hear.com Horizon
Cost$5,000+
Type of Hearing AidCiC, BTE, RIC
Type of Hearing Loss Mild to severe
BluetoothYes
BatteryRechargeable
TelecoilNo
WarrantyOne- to three-year warranty, 45-day no risk trial
FinancingYes
Phonak Audéo Paradise
Cost$1,998-$4,598
Type of Hearing AidRIC
Type of Hearing Loss Mild to severe
BluetoothYes
Battery312 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
TelecoilYes, some models
WarrantyOne-year warranty and 60-day money-back guarantee
FinancingVaries by retailer
Audien
Cost$89-$249
Type of Hearing AidITC
Type of Hearing Loss Mild to moderate
BluetoothNo
BatteryRechargeable
TelecoilNo
Warranty15-day limited warranty, 45-day money-back guarantee, lifetime protection for $4 per month
FinancingNo
MDHearing Aid
Cost$800-$1,600
Type of Hearing AidBTE
Type of Hearing Loss Mild to moderate
BluetoothYes, some models
Battery312 and 13 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
TelecoilYes, some models
WarrantyLimited, 90-day basic warranty and 45-day money-back trial
FinancingYes
Widex Moment
Cost$1,950-$3,600
Type of Hearing AidRIC, ITE, BTE
Type of Hearing Loss Mild to severe
BluetoothYes
Battery312, 13, or 10 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
TelecoilYes, some models
WarrantyOne-year warranty and 45-day money-back guarantee
FinancingVaries by retailer
Audicus
Cost$998-$2,798
Type of Hearing AidRIC, CIC, BTE
Type of Hearing Loss Mild to severe
BluetoothYes
Battery312 or 10 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
TelecoilYes, some models
WarrantyOne-year warranty and 45-day money-back guarantee
FinancingYes
Signia
Cost$2,898-$4,598
Type of Hearing AidRIC, ITE, CIC, BTE, ITC
Type of Hearing Loss Mild to profound
BluetoothYes
Battery312 or 10 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
TelecoilYes, some models
Warranty1-year warranty and 45-day money-back guarantee
FinancingVaries by retailer
ReSound One
Cost$3,198-$4,798
Type of Hearing AidRITE
Type of Hearing Loss Mild to severe
BluetoothYEs
Battery312 and 13 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
TelecoilYes
WarrantyOne-year warranty and 30-day money-back guarantee
FinancingVaries by retailer
Oticon More
Cost$2,700-$4,800
Type of Hearing AidRITE
Type of Hearing Loss Mild to severe
BluetoothYes
Battery312 standard disposable battery and rechargeable battery option
TelecoilYes
WarrantyThree-year manufacturer warranty, three-year loss and damage protection, and 45-day money-back trial
FinancingVaries by retailer

Prices accurate as of March 24, 2022

What You Need to Know Before Buying a Hearing Aid

Hearing aids are not one-size-fits-all. It’s critical that you choose a device that will meet your needs and fit seamlessly into your lifestyle. That’s why Hope Lanter, Au.D., lead audiologist at Hear.com, recommends consulting with a hearing care professional before buying.

“Hearing aids are medical devices, and it’s important to consult a hearing care professional so they can conduct a hearing test to assess your needs and recommend a device that is the right fit for you,” she says. Most hearing aids are appropriate for mild to moderately severe hearing loss, but profound loss may require a specific style like a BTE.

What is a Hearing Aid?

A hearing aid is a medical technology device worn in or behind the ear to combat hearing loss. These devices can help anyone with mild to severe hearing loss. People with severe to profound hearing loss may need to consider other options, like cochlear implants.

Hearing aids have helped people of all ages–from infants to seniors–better engage with the world around them. In the past, hearing aids were analog devices that amplified all soundwaves at the same level. Today’s digital hearing aids use computer chips.

How Do Hearing Aids Work?

Hearing aids help improve hearing in both noisy and quiet environments. They work by magnifying sound vibrations as the vibrations enter the ear.

Most ear hearing aids use directional microphones to pick up sound. They also use an amplifier to make sound louder and a speaker to produce sound amplification in the ear. The devices usually rest in the ear canal or behind the ear to make sound detection easy.

Modern digital hearing aids convert sounds into digital signals. The hearing aid computer processors can then separate those signals into noise and speech. That’s why today’s hearing aids are much more effective and helpful than past devices.

Benefits of Hearing Aids

Hearing aids come with many benefits. The biggest benefit, of course, is the ability to help fight hearing loss. Hearing aids help people with mild to severe hearing loss by making it easier for them to hear sounds and speech.

Improved hearing is a huge benefit that leads to many smaller benefits. Those benefits include making it easier to:

  • Talk on the phone. Hearing aids can help you hear conversations during phone calls. This is especially true with devices that can wirelessly connect to your phone through Bluetooth technology so you can use them as an earpiece for your phone.
  • Watch movies and TV. With hearing aids, you won’t have to turn your TV volume way up to hear it. They also work well in movie theaters, as they allow you to distinguish dialogue from sound effects and music in a loud environment.
  • Drive. Hearing aids can make you a sharper, more alert driver. 
  • Listen to music. Whether it’s live or recorded music, hearing aids can help you hear instruments and lyrics without having to turn the volume up.
  • Engage in conversation. Hearing aids can help you converse with loved ones, neighbors, or the cashier at the grocery store.

Hearing Aids Features to Consider

Here are some of the best features to consider when choosing the right set of hearing aids for you:

  • Directional microphones: Improves the ability to hear when in a noisy environment or if there’s a great deal of background noise. They enhance sound reception in the front of the user while reducing some of the sounds coming from the sides and behind the user. 
  • Feedback suppression: Ensures that any amplified sounds do not register through the microphones. The quality of feedback suppression in hearing aids depends on the user’s hearing difficulty and the fit of the hearing unit.
  • Digital noise reduction: Allows the hearing aids to increase and decrease the volume in loud environments, letting the user hear direct conversations better. The amount of noise reduction will vary, depending on the hearing unit.
  • Tinnitus masking: Generates and transmits broadband or narrow-band noise at low frequencies. Its design helps alleviate tinnitus (unique internal clicking, buzzing, ringing, or hissing sounds) by amplifying natural environmental sounds.
  • Rechargeable batteries: Makes hearing aid maintenance easier by allowing the user to plug in and recharge a hearing unit’s batteries rather than remove and dispose of worn-out batteries.
  • Telecoil: Reduces sounds from the environment and registers sound more clearly from a hearing-aid-compatible telephone. It also picks up signals from induction loop systems in public, allowing to hear sounds better in places like churches, movie theaters, or stage auditoriums.
  • Impulse noise and wind reduction technologies: Lowers the amplification for sudden, quick noises like jangling keys, clinking silverware, or wind blowing while improving sound quality and listening comfort.
  • Wireless connectivity: Provides a wireless connection directly to selective Bluetooth-compatible devices, such as TVs, music players, smartphones, or computers.
  • Pre-programmed settings: Supports and saves many different pre-programmed hearing settings designed for various sound environments and listening needs.

How Much Do Hearing Aids Cost?

Hearing aids are a major purchase. Even with budget models, you’re looking at several hundred dollars per device. With more expensive brands, you can expect to pay several thousand dollars per aid. 

In general, costs depend on the brand, model, and where you purchase. Currently, you can buy hearing aids through an audiologist, hearing center, or online. 

In general, hearing aid prices range from $400 to more than $6,000 per pair. On average, a high-quality device will cost between $1,800 and $5,000. This is a wide range, but it takes into account discounted prices offered by online discount suppliers, as well as full retail prices. 

One thing to note: The price you see listed online or in an informational brochure is often per aid, not per pair, so it’s important to read the fine print.

How To Find Affordable Hearing Aids

As we’ve noted, hearing aid devices are usually not cheap. We’ve rounded up the 7 best cheap hearing aids of 2022, but even the price tags of those can quickly jump into the thousands. That’s because a lot of research goes into making hearing aid technology as effective as possible. Constant improvements are being made all the time, especially to high-end, high-quality devices. 

Some companies provide financing with low or no interest. You can also look for discounts and financial help through various organizations, like the AARP Hearing Care Program, Kiwanis, Lions Club, and Allegro Credit.

Some hearing aids, like Audien, specialize in low-cost products without sacrificing quality. Other providers, like MDHearingAid, have promotions that sell devices at a fraction of the price.

Other Ways to Save Money on Hearing Aids

Investing in a good hearing aid can significantly change your quality of life, so it’s worth it to shop around or find out whether you have access to any benefits or assistance to help pay for them. Here are a few proven ways to save money:

  • Medicare: Unfortunately, Medicare Part A and Part B do not offer hearing aid benefits. But, you may be eligible for some benefits if you have a Medicare Advantage Plan or Part C. To determine whether you have benefits to apply toward hearing aid prices with Medicare Part C, contact your plan provider for more information.
  • Medicaid: In some states, Medicaid will cover the cost of hearing aids when medically necessary. Make sure to check eligibility in your state before purchasing.
  • FSA/HSA: If you have a flexible spending account (FSA) or health savings account (HSA), you may be able to use funds from either of these accounts to cover the cost of a hearing aid. Check with your individual plan and hearing aid retailer for more information.
  • Private medical insurance: Very few private insurance companies cover the cost of a hearing aid instrument for adults. Some may offer partial or full coverage for hearing tests and evaluations, but not a hearing aid device. Talk with your benefits manager to find out whether your plan provides benefits for adults.
  • Online discount network: Some online suppliers offer discounts up to 35 percent off the retail price.

Where to Buy Hearing Aids

Buying Hearing Aids Online

There is no right or wrong way to buy hearing aids. In the past, the only way you could buy hearing aids was through an audiologist. Now, hearing aids are much easier to get because you can buy them over-the-counter and even online.

You may wonder how you can buy a hearing aid online without trying it on first. How can you know if the hearing aids will fit your ear correctly? 

While you may not know a hearing aid’s fit until you try it on, most hearing aids come with a 30-day money-back guarantee. That means you can return the devices at no charge if they don’t fit. Some hearing aids even have 45, 60, and 100-day guarantees.

What about your level of hearing loss? How do you know the hearing aids you choose will address your hearing loss in the right manner? Thanks to the Internet, there are a multitude of free hearing tests you can take from the comfort of your home. 

These tests may not be as thorough as a hearing test administered by a licensed audiologist, but they can give you a good picture of how much hearing loss you have and what hearing aids you need. One free hearing test to start with is Lively’s test.

In today’s market, it’s easier than ever to get the hearing aids you need to help your hearing loss. Read our roundup of the five best over-the-counter hearing aids for more information.

Buying Hearing Aids In-Person

Although hearing aids can be purchased online today, navigating the process on your own is not always recommended. 

According to Dr. Lanter, Au.D., the best way to buy hearing aids is through setting up a consultation and fitting with a hearing care professional. “Hearing care professionals have all the resources needed to evaluate your hearing, recommend a solution, and get you on the path to a better quality of life,” she said. 

Plus, everyone’s hearing ability is different. According to Dr. Lanter, scheduling a hearing test with a hearing professional will help you get the most individualized care and help you select the device  that best addresses your hearing loss. 

“Not only can hearing care professionals help you with hearing loss, but they can also check for any other underlying issues that may be affecting your ability to hear and recommend a proper course of action,” she said. Following said consultation, you can then buy hearing aids based on this professional recommendation.

One good provider is Costco. The company has a nice range of devices with strong features, like Bluetooth. You’ll also find that Costco´s selection has good prices and an impressive 180-day trial period. 

Also noteworthy is the fact that Costco’s Hearing Center provides consultations, hearing tests, and fittings. Keep in mind, though, that these centers don’t usually have audiologists on staff.

You can also get hearing aids from other big retailers, like Walmart, and others. Walmart carries respected brands, such as MDHearingAid, and more.

How to Find the Best-Fitting Hearing Aid

When it comes to buying a hearing aid, finding one that fits is critical. If your device is falling out or irritating your skin, you might not wear it as often as you should. With that in mind, here are some tips to help you get the best-fitting hearing aid:

  • Make an appointment for a hearing exam with a doctor, audiologist, or hearing expert. They can determine the degree of hearing loss and recommend the best hearing aid.
  • Consider your lifestyle. If you’re active, look at hearing aids designed for a lot of movement.
  • Consider a custom-fit hearing aid. Some audiologists and online retailers can make a custom-fit using an ear mold. This gives you a device made specifically for your ear anatomy.
  • Don’t wait too long to ask follow-up questions. If the hearing aid is not fitting correctly or causing pain, contact the manufacturer or hearing care expert for help.

Types of Hearing Aids

Hearing aid styles have come a long way over the last decade. Instead of being limited to one or two models, there are now several types of models available. This gives you a lot of flexibility when choosing a style that best fits your needs. 

Your biggest choice when deciding on a hearing aid type is what size you want them to be. The larger the device, the more built-in features they’ll have. Some users will favor small and discrete features, while others will opt for premium high-end features. 

Each hearing aid type strikes a different balance between size and functionality. You’ll need to find the right balance for you.

Here are some common types of hearing aids.

Behind-the-Ear (BTE) Hearing Aids

Behind the ear

This type of hearing aid rests behind your ear and loops over the top of it with a plastic tube. The other end of the tube connects to an earpiece that’s customized to fit perfectly inside your ear canal.

Behind-the-ear hearing aids may be bigger than other types. However, they provide more built-in features, like telecoil and directional mics. They can also cater to those with severe hearing loss.

Behind-the-ear hearing aids can sometimes be easier to customize to your liking as well. Some people, though, find the earpiece makes them feel like their ears are plugged too much, creating a strange, almost vacuum-like experience.

Mini Behind-the-Ear (mBTE) Hearing Aids

Above Ear Mini

Mini behind-the-ear devices are sometimes called receiver-in-the-canal (RIC) or receiver-in-the-ear (RITE) hearing aids. They rest behind the ear like BTE hearing aids, but they’re not as big and more discreet. For added discretion, we recommend choosing one to match your hair color.

Mini behind-the-ear hearing aids have smaller wires and receivers than traditional behind-the-ear types. This can help prevent the user from feeling like they have a clogged ear canal. You’ll find mini behind-the-ear models add smooth usability and function, while also maintaining a small and easy-to-wear design.

In-the-Ear (ITE) Hearing Aids

In Ear Mini

In-the-ear hearing aids rest all the way in your ear at all times. With their larger size, these types can provide features like directional mics, Bluetooth, and telecoil. However, they aren’t as big as behind-the-ear types, and as such, don’t provide as much power. 

Some users may like the smaller feel of ITE hearing aids, and the fact that using these types of aids still allows them to retain some nice features while downsizing in bulk. However, they still may not be ideal for those looking for discreteness.

In-the-Canal (ITC) Hearing Aids

In Canal Mini

In-the-canal hearing aids rest deep inside the ear canal. They’re harder to see than ITE devices. They balance a smaller model while enabling long battery life and directional mics. Users may experience problems with moisture and earwax due to how far into the ear canal these devices sit.

Completely-in-the-Canal (CIC) Hearing Aids

Complete Canal

Completely-in-the-canal devices are sometimes referred to as mini CICs or invisible-in-the-canal (IIC) hearing aids. They’re the smallest type, and the best if you’re looking for something discrete. They rest even further into the ear canal than ITC types, with only a small wire visible outside the ear. You can pull this wire to remove the device from the ear.

With a near-invisible wear, CICs have less feedback for telephone use and also combat wind noise. However, they’re so small that they can’t always pack in the top-tier features. For instance, directional mics or long-life batteries might be missing. 

Moisture and earwax can also be a problem, given how far the devices rest in the ear canal. Batteries can also be difficult to change if they’re not rechargeable.

Digital vs. Analog Hearing Aids

The FDA recognizes a distinction between digital hearing aids and analog hearing aids. The biggest difference is how each device processes sound. 

Analog devices amplify soundwaves but aren’t able to separate words from noises. They sometimes use programmable settings to better adapt to environments. The user has to push a button to make this happen, though.

Digital devices use computer chips to duplicate soundwaves. That way, they can better analyze and identify speech from noises. Digital devices also automatically adapt to environments and levels of hearing loss. All options we recommended above are digital hearing aids.

Hearing Aids And Hearing Amplifiers

Hearing aids amplify sounds the user has difficulty hearing. Since hearing amplifiers amplify all sounds, background noise and other distracting sounds that hearing aids can minimize will be louder as well.  

Hearing amplifiers, also known as personal sound amplification products (PSAPs), can be purchased over the counter, which means there is no required visit with an audiologist or prescription. Also, hearing amplifiers aren’t regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Personal sound amplification products have three main components: a microphone, an amplifier, and a receiver. They work together to amplify all sounds in the wearer’s environment. 

PSAPs shouldn’t be used to address hearing loss, but they are beneficial for activities that require sound amplification, such as bird watching, hunting, and live theater.

Our Criteria for Choosing the Best Hearing Aids

We consulted audiologists and geriatric care experts in addition to independently testing various models. We read thousands of verified customer reviews from trusted third parties such as Better Business Bureau (BBB) and TrustPilot.

Through this in-depth research, we determined the following to be the most important criteria to consider when shopping for a hearing aid:

  • Price
  • Audiologist care
  • Comfort and fit
  • Warranty
  • Customer satisfaction
  • Customer service
  • Features such as Bluetooth capability and rechargeable batteries
  • Reliability

Bottom Line

There’s no shortage of hearing aid devices on the market today. And with several options available online and in-person, there’s a good chance you’ll find one that fits your needs.

With that being said, if you’re looking for the best hearing aids for the money, MDHearingAid may be for you. The company offers decent devices with a price point that is much lower than other hearing aids. However, if remote care and customer experience top your list of needs, consider Lively. Eargo is a good match for people with mild to moderate hearing loss, but if you’re looking for the best hearing aids for severe hearing loss, Phonak has some of the best products in the industry.

Frequently Asked Questions

The best hearing aid on the market is the Lively 2 Plus, which costs $1,595 per pair. These hearing aids scored highest and performed best in our testing.
WRITTEN BY

Sara Lindberg is a freelance writer specializing in health, fitness, senior care and nutrition. With a master’s in education and bachelor’s in exercise science, she has worked as a personal trainer and group exercise specialist for older adults. Her work has appeared in several national print and media publications. In her own life, caring for a parent with health issues has allowed her to see firsthand how critical it is for seniors and their families to have accurate, compassionate, and relatable information as they make decisions about aging in place.

MEDICALLY REVIEWED BY

Dr. Brad Ingrao, Au.D. is a practicing audiologist. Since the 1990s, he has personally fitted thousands of people with hearing aids. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Education of the Speech and Hearing Handicapped, a Master’s in Audiology, and a Doctorate in Audiology. He has taught at three universities and presented at professional conferences in two continents.